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ribble rivers trust blog


  • Water saving doesn’t have to mean dodging the shower, smelly socks, and wilting plants. There are lots of super easy ways we can cut down on water consumption around the house. Every drop saved means a little less stress on our water supplies. Plus, it’ll reduce your carbon footprint and
  • Our consultation has now ended, and we’ve collected and collated the results of the surveys. We’d like to thank everyone that took part in the survey and helped to shape the future of this area. You can find out more about the project by clicking here. Consultation Results One of
  • Two Lancashire car dealerships have pledged staff time to help with conservation improvements on the River Ribble and its associated tributaries.  Bowker MINI on Preston Docks and Trident Park in Blackburn will volunteer staff time to The Ribble Rivers Trust from August. The centres will also invite MINI owners to
  • Langden Brook is one of the not so hidden gems in the Ribble catchment. A tributary of the River Hodder, this area is one of the few remaining strongholds for salmon. It is also an important part of our drinking water infrastructure. As part of the Stocks Reservoir network of
  • Instantly recognizable thanks to its pretty pink flowers, Himalayan Balsam is present at the sides of most of the Ribble catchments watercourses. Despite providing a gorgeous display of sweetly scented flowers, this plant is one of our top environmental offenders! Introduced in the Victorian period as ornamental plants (alongside Japanese
  • Citizen science is a really important part of our work. Like all of our volunteers, these specially trained groups include people from a wide range of backgrounds who all share one thing in common- a passion for nature and the outdoors. Together, they take part in training courses and events,
  • Here in Lancashire, we’re pretty lucky when it comes to access to outdoor spaces. Although we get to enjoy these places all year round (for free!), our rivers, lakes, parks, and gardens really come to life when the sun is shining. As a charity working to improve and promote the
  • Three young people are beginning careers in conservation after successfully completing their Kickstart training with Ribble Rivers Trust. David Bevis, Bethany Ryan and Jay Malpas all aspired to careers in conservation but found opportunities few and far between. However, they were recruited by RRT under the government’s Kickstart scheme, launched
  • The hot weather is here! Whether you love to bask in the sunshine, chill out with an ice cream, or stay indoors and keep cool, we know how to look after ourselves in the hot weather. However, our furry, feathered, and many legged friends need to keep cool too. A
  • Natural flood management (NFM) is a flood risk management strategy that uses natural water processes to try and reduce flood risk. When used alone it can have a significant impact on areas that are prone to less serious flooding. It is also very handy for protecting areas where, when flooding
  • There are some exciting improvements underway in the next phase of work at Peel Park and the Coppice Local Nature Reserve in Accrington. Ribble Rivers Trust, Hyndburn Council and the Prospects Foundation have teamed up to deliver further work at the site. In 2018 the local council thrilled local residents
  • From the deepest depths of the ocean to tiny tinkling brooks, all of our streams, rivers, and seas are connected. But did you know this goes even further? How often do you think about the gleaming blue waters of our coastline whilst you watch rain run down a roadside into
  • Ribble Rivers Trust have launched their exciting new Safe to Splash campaign which aims to secure bathing water status for a local paddling hotspot on River Ribble at Edisford Bridge, Clitheroe. The launch of the campaign for Bathing Water Status is a way of improving water quality for local wildlife
  • Our mental and physical health have never been more important, with many of us still feeling the mental, as well as physical, impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic. Figures from the Office for National Statistics show that almost 21% of adults were experiencing depression when surveyed in 2021. This is almost
  • An exciting new partnership to deliver new woodlands across Lancashire. Ribble Rivers Trust are happy to be announcing a partnership with Woodland Trust which will see new native woodlands created across Lancashire. The exciting new partnership will support the Northern Forest ‘Grow Back Greener’ tree planting programme managed by the
  • An exciting new collaborative project will see further improvements to the Long Preston Deeps. The Long Preston Floodplain Project is an ongoing partnership between the Yorkshire Dales Millennium Trust (YDMT), RSPB, Natural England, the Environment Agency, North Yorkshire County Council, Ribble Rivers Trust, local landowners and the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority. Sited
  • Have you spotted any frogs emerging from hibernation yet? Now that spring is here, you’ll probably start to see frogs and other amazing amphibians around ponds, bogs, and other damp areas where they are searching for a partner to breed with. In fact, frog spawn is already popping up in
  • Have you ever wondered what it is like to work for Ribble Rivers Trust? Out latest recruit Alice has documented her first few weeks here at the Trust, giving us all the details on what its like to be kicking off a career in conservation! Hello! My name is Alice
  • Our Community Projects and Activities Officer Helen has been racking up some miles this year testing our circular river walk routes and leading them as guided walks. Below she tells us more about some of the highlights of the series of guided walks and her walk recommendations for getting out
  • Planting trees is a vital tool in the fight against climate change. But how do we make sure we plant the right trees in the right place? When we’re planning a woodland, or any project for that matter, we spend a huge amount of time on research. One of the
  • Eye of newt, and toe of frog, wool of bat, and tongue of dog That’s what the Three Witches used for their famous brew in Shakespeare’s Macbeth. But did you know that the Three Witches were probably referring to mustard seed, buttercup, holly leaves, and houndstongue! In ancient times this